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Heathkit Most Accurate Clock (HMAC)
Click on photos to see enlargement.
  Interpretation of Historical Graphical Data  
    Sample5MHz 5 MHz Frequency Band
This is a one-year graphical plot of the HMAC's sync-up history on the 5 MHz frequency band. You will notice that the 5 MHz band only propagates when the atmosphere is not ionized by the sun's radiation (i.e., sunlight). You can also see that from May through September this band's propagation pretty much disappears, only to reappear again from September through May. You can begin to see the "arch" of the sync-up times in the evening getting earlier as you approach December (winter solstice) and getting later as you approach June (summer solstice).
   
         
    Sample10MHz 10 MHz Frequency Band
This is a one-year graphical plot of the HMAC's sync-up history on the 10 MHz frequency band. Like the 5 MHz band, it too is only active when there is no sunlight ionizing the atmosphere. Unlike the 5 MHz frequency band, however, it does not fade out in the summer months. The evening sync-up "arch" is not as pronounced as in the 5 MHz frequency band, but it is still somewhat visible.
   
         
    Sample15MHz 15 MHz Frequency Band
This is a one-year graphical plot of the HMAC's sync-up history on the 15 MHz frequency band. Unlike the 5 MHz and 10 MHz bands, the 15 MHz band does rely on sunlight ionizing the atmosphere for its propagation characteristics. It too, however, does fade out in the summer months (May through September). The June centered peaked "arch" is clearly visible on this band. (It wraps around to about 1:00 AM the next morning centered around June.)
   
         
       
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